All posts tagged: makers

Rethinking Logevity with Repair Revolution

I slung a nine-year-old pair of jeans (yes, nine) over my left shoulder and my camera over my right. My mom’s 46-year-old watch was on my left wrist and a great aunt’s old, old opal ring on my right hand. Longevity, for me, means keeping stuff I want, either for its meaning or for its worn in perfect fit. But keeping stuff and not having to buy “new” means the need for periodic fixing. It goes like this: You have that thing you need to repair, you are too lazy, ill-equipped, unaware or unskilled. So, that great thing just sits there, busted. Or, you go to Target and buy a sad substitute. More waste, more unneeded acquisition of stuff. Multiply this scenario by a ton of people. In comes Repair Revolution to help us keep the stuff we love and reduce waste. It aims to bring repair under one roof where skilled craftsmen repair a range of goods. On Saturday I took my broke-down jeans to the Repair Revolution pop-up salon, hosted at OwlNWood in …

Don’t Doubt Yourself – Says The M Machine

Contribution by Lilit Barseghyan, Sophomore at Lowell High School. As a high school student interested in music production, there aren’t many resources available to help expand upon this interest. I spend a good amount of time trying to find classes or teachers around San Francisco to help me learn the programs and skills I need. While searching for classes, I stumbled upon a music production school, Pyramind, and spotted an announcement about a special event they were going to host at their campus. The M Machine, Ben Swardlick and Eric Luttrell, former graduates, were returning to Pyramind to host a small group session where students and others could come join and listen to how they started their career and ask questions. Seeing as how this could be a useful experience for me, I signed up and went to the event. Once I approached the building and stood in line, the first thing that struck me was how much older everyone was, either college aged students or older. As I walked into the main room where …

SFMade manufacture

Manufacturers Stand Up in San Francisco

On my end of the phone, I apologized for the humming refrigerator. On her end, Janet Lees, Senior Director of SFMade, apologized for the clanging in the tech shop.  We talked about the origins of the organization aimed at supporting manufacturing in San Francisco at the nadir of the recession and its rapid expansion since then. The SFMade journey, expanding membership and programs We started in 2010 with 12 local manufacturers who were iconic brands in San Francisco, including Anchor (Brewing), McRoskey Mattresses, one of the oldest manufactures in the city, more than 100 years old, Ritual Coffee, Rickshaw Bags (founded by former head of Timbuk2, Mark Dwight). Mark created the SFMade logo, he was the founder of the brand. (Executive Director) Kate Sofis and I started to build the organization around the brand. Both of us come from economic development backgrounds, and we knew each other from our previous jobs. I worked for the Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center and Kate at Pacific Community Ventures. Kate has a background in supply chain and she used to …

Tinker, Tailor

Maker – the label is elastic. Technologists, artists, craftspeople, engineers, tool-wielding types. And on, and on. This week’s posts show their motley range, with features and mentions of : an app developer, a painter, bike craftsmen, blacksmith, textiles artist, 3D printing master… some leaning digital, others leaning analogue Common denominator. Invention. Uncommon motives and ends. To what end? Understanding the cogs and sprockets inside our mechanized world? Rejection of disposable objects?  To make, rather than consume. To feel more connected to our world. Whoa This is getting too philosophical… … and very Bay Area. San Mateo hosts MakerFaire, the maker movement’s big shindig. Code for America‘s headquarters are in San Francisco. I hope we explore stories about positive change that comes from makers making.  How are makers designing the way to a better Bay? How does D.I.Y translate into civic planning? (Do It Together). Can we quantify the movement’s impact, are we over-hyping its promise, or is maker just a new label for inventors? Tinker on. (Haleh) Photo – Fez, where craftsmen use the same tools …

Something About Twigs & Branches

Painter Lorely Bunoan spins garden cuttings into gold. Watch her working to the sound of BART trains lumbering through East Oakland. (video) Her pieces, she says, are meant to be hung any which way.  I was torn between holding the camera and the urge to sketch a branch alongside her. Circling Lorely as she drew, though, kept me warm in the cavernous studio.  Eventually, the two of us fell into our own cadences, she tracing twigs, and I tracing the painter.         (Haleh)

We Can Make That

I had the pleasure of chatting with Albert Eloyan, a young entrepreneur, Bay Area resident, and one of the co-founders of Jargon (former Colatris), a start-up that helps mobile developers localize their apps.   He shares the pains and rewards of startup culture, including how travel, relocation and boxing (with gloves, not packing material) played a role.  (Gohar)

D.I.Y. Power

Do It Yourself. That’s how BayMozaic came to be.  Two of us have picked up media classes at Laney College, 2 of us met years ago in a photo course at City College (SF), 3 of us are self-taught WordPressers, 2 of us drop in on co-work spaces around the Bay for inspiration, community, and connections…and to make things. Community college is rocket fuel for D.I.Y., a place to connect with talent, tools, ideas, and to experiment with guidance from practicing professionals Tech Liminal in Oakland offers WordPress support and other maker-fare, CHEAP Libraries have FREE technical manuals online, so teach yourself stuff! Google it and YouTube your tutorials – FREE Student talent, drive and gusto have propelled me to hack challenges I would never have taken on before. I’m grateful for their generosity. They motivate me, as do other D.I.Y. folks I know who’ve abandoned secure jobs to be their own maker-bosses. The artist/surfer founders of Little House in the Orchard, the blacksmith and 3D printing podcaster at 3D Printing Today are some that …